Canadian Pharmacy Research Data On Cialis Lowering Cholesterol

According to a recent study by Canadian Pharmacy mycanadianpharmacyrx.com, men taking Cialis have lower ‘bad’ cholesterol counts as compared to those who do not take the ED drug. The data has been collected from 100 men who have been taking Cialis pills regularly within the last 2 years running up to the study. The data received has not yet been given any plausible explanation by scientists, but it gives firm grounds to believe that tadalafil (the main component of Cialis) has its benefits in lowering the amount of LDL, or ‘bad’, cholesterol. This rings especially true if we come to consider that high cholesterol levels, as well as other cardiovascular problems, is one of the main causes of ed. Let’s have a closer look at the connection between cholesterol levels, ED and Cialis therapy.

The-role and dangers of cholesterol

Related Cialis news: A Regular Cialis Taker Dishes Out Some Practical Secrets

The role and dangers of cholesterol

In general, perception of high cholesterol means heart and brain steroid fat, in the sense of risk of stroke and heart attack, but today also due to the fact that we tend to be adequately prevented, we see fewer occurrences of these acute events. However, we may find more frequent phenomena related to chronic damage from cholesterol, linked to a show of years of our small, middle and large blood vessels.

How do these phenomena manifest themselves, if we remember that they are not as easy to detect as a heart attack or a stroke? For example, a typical phenomenon also linked to age advancement – and hence the time of exposure to cholesterol – is a decrease in cognitive functions, especially memory, so basically little forgetfulness that does not necessarily start in the worst form of a dementia, but they can seriously alter our quality of life.

As for another more vascular sector, typically male, we can remember that high cholesterol is also associated with damage to small blood vessels that carry blood to the sexual organs: consequently chronic hypercholesterolemia is often linked to a a decrease in sexual performance, which could be avoided by managing the most common cardiovascular risk factors in time.

Cholesterol is an organic compound belonging to the steroid lipid family. Our body has several important, important and essential functions: it is a component of cell membranes, which regulates fluidity and permeability; it is the precursor of vitamin D, bile salts and steroid hormones, both male and female (testosterone, progesterone, estradiol, cortisol, etc.). Good cholesterol, despite this leading biological role, when cholesterol circulates in blood at concentrations above the standard, becomes a bitter enemy to our health. And like all the toughest opponents, high cholesterol can only be defeated by knowing it thoroughly and using that information to process appropriate defensive and counter-tactical strategies.

Cholesterol is derived from both food and endogenous synthesis. High cholesterol foods are those of animal origin, generally rich in saturated fat such as eggs, butter, meat, salami, cheeses and some crustaceans. About 80-90% of total cholesterol is produced autonomously by our body, especially from the liver but also from the adrenal glands and the sexual glands. This explains why in some subjects, despite a balanced diet and a regular physical activity program, cholesterol levels remain high. When endogenous production is physiologically elevated, as in these cases, it is referred to as family hypercholesterolemia.

Whatever its origin, hypercholesterolemia is characterized by a higher cholesterol concentration (cholesterolemia) than normal. Being cholesterol a lipid, it is poorly soluble in water and to be transported in the circulatory stream, therefore, it is necessary to bind to specific lipoproteins. Cholesterol mainly binds to low-density lipoproteins or LDL (the so-called bad cholesterol). It is estimated that about 60-80% of total cholesterol is linked to LDL.

The excess cholesterol bound to these lipoproteins tends to accumulate on the endothelium of the arteries, forming increasingly dense aggregates to generate true plaques, called atheromas. These plaques lose the natural elasticity of the arteries and can cause serious damage especially to the heart (infarction) or to the brain (stroke).

Good cholesterol is represented by HDLs (high density lipoproteins) that purify the arteries by capturing excess cholesterol and transferring it to the tissues (especially the liver) where it is disposed of. The higher the level of HDL in the blood and the lower the risk of developing atherosclerosis and all other negative consequences of hypercholesterolemia.

By virtue of this feature, in recent years the role of HDL has been re-evaluated in an important way, so that the relationship between HDL and LDL is now more significant than the value of total cholesterol. Generally, ‘good’ cholesterol (HDL) should not be less than 30% of total cholesterol (LDL + HDL). Another parameter, known as the cardiovascular risk index, correlates total cholesterol with HDL. If this ratio is greater than 5 in humans and 4.5 in women, the patient is considered at risk.

Ffollowing a balanced diet, low calorie but not too restrictive, it is possible to decrease total cholesterolemia and elevate the HDL fraction. Insulin represents a strong stimulus for endogenous production of cholesterol; high glycemic foods, moderate to medium-high but high-glucose foods (bread, pasta and cereals in general) should be avoided alongside with meals made up of carbohydrates only.

LDL saturated fat increases total cholesterol but leaves the relationship with the good one unchanged while hydrogenated fatty acids (contained in foods such as margarine, peanut butter, etc.), as well as raising bad cholesterol levels, also lowering HDL cholesterol. Increasing the supply of fiber-rich foods interferes with intestinal cholesterol absorption and provides the body with a full supply of antioxidants, essential to prevent atherosclerosis and many other pathologies. By preferring mono-unsaturated and polyunsaturated fats, it is possible to increase the fraction of good HDL cholesterol. These foods are also rich in plant sterols, natural substances that help fight cholesterol.

Why most Cialis takes fall into cholesterol risk group

Why most Cialis takes fall into cholesterol risk group (2)

Most of these risk factors (hypertension, diabetes, obesity and stress) can be reduced by associating above indicated food with a regular physical activity program. We should also remember that regular exercise is able to increase good HDL cholesterol levels. Cholesterol problems create cardiovascular trouble and other functional problems with the body, including ED. ED, as a matter of fact, is most commonly a secondary event that signals more serious health problems. Thus, it is roughly estimated that every third person buying Cialis Online suffers from high cholesterol and related problems (according to the internal statistics of Canadian Pharmacy received in anonymous customer polling).

The good news is that there is action to be taken in order to minimize the harmful action of cholesterol, and simultaneously lay a solid ground for a healthier erectile function. Cialis may be used to treat the symptoms of ED, but, according to a recently received data, it is associated with a steady drop in cholesterol levels: yet another double win you receive when taking a stand for a better sexual and general health.

Here is what you can do to fight high cholesterol, alongside with taking Cialis, in order to lower cholesterol in a decisive way: healthy eating, physical activity, no smoking, weight control, blood pressure monitoring and targeted treatment with specific anti-cholesterol-specific supplements. Regularly consume supplements of fish oil, cod oil, linseed oil and medicinal plant extracts such as rosemary, garlic, boldo and artichoke can help increase good cholesterol levels. Your other allies are: devil’s claw, artichoke, wheat germ, juniper, blueberry, onion, guar gum, guggul gum, psyllium seeds, lecithin, vegetable sterols, seaweed, apple, lemon, red rice fermented and soybean.

How cholesterol is linked to ED

Following general guidelines will help you reduce the risk for cardiovascular risk reduction, but at the same time, adopt behaviors useful in preventing a problem involving about 13% of the male population: erection disorders, more properly defined as erectile dysfunction. ED can be caused by several factors, not least the psychological one, but very often its origin is more complex, so that specialists today tend to regard it as a symptom, rather than a pathology to itself. In other words, an alarm bell that something that does not go into the body, is often the cause of vascular and metabolic disorders that can endanger our heart. Behind the possible episodes of erectile dysfunction, such as diabetes, hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, and hypertriglyceridemia can be concealed, which is the main risk factor for stroke and stroke.

The way to look at the issue is in fact twofold: those who suffer from erectile dysfunction must keep an eye on their heart because they may be at risk but specularly you can claim that taking care of your cardiovascular health, especially by reducing cholesterol, it is good for the functioning of the sexual organ first. That the well-being of the heart is closely linked to that of the penis should not be surprising, since the good functioning of both organs depends on the state of health of the blood vessels.

The various causes of erectile dysfunction certainly contribute to the state of hardness of the vessels; this means that if the atherosclerotic plaque is also formed in the arteries of the penis, clearly the blood can not flow sufficiently and thus the erection disorder develops. Platelet development on the inner walls of the vessels is mainly due to the presence of high cholesterol in the blood that goes into an oxidation process. Penile arteries are more ‘sensitive’ to the problem, since having a diameter smaller than the others tend to clog up before, somehow ‘anticipating’ more serious events.

Taking quality supplements, which also effectively work against oxidative cholesterol, as well as limiting absorption and synthesis, can be the best combined strategy to maintain good sexual function and at the same time prevent possible cardiovascular events.

Statins used to fight high cholesterol may cause ED

Statins used to fight high cholesterol may cause ED

ED may be a ‘premonitor’ sign of a vascular problem. Vascular damage caused, for example, by the presence of excess cholesterol in the blood, results in greater cardiovascular risk, but bring with it the related problem of erectile dysfunction. Like the other organs, the penis is sprayed from internal arteries covered by a tissue called endothelium, which must be intact to respond effectively to the dilatation stimuli determined by erection.’

In order to fight cholesterol, statins are often prescribed, but those pose a risk for ED. That in your fight against cholesterol you put your sexual function on the line might seem an exaggerated statement, but  the body of scientific evidence has been building for quite some time now.

Those who take statins to lower cholesterol alarmingly often become sexually impotent, experts say.50% of patients complaining about libido loss and ED report to take statin-based drugs to lower cholesterol levels (learn more about cholesterol level: mycanadianpharmacyrx.com/cholesterol-level.html) and vascular pathologies.

Once the medicines in question are suspended, patients no longer have problems with the sexual sphere. The mechanism is simple – statins inhibit the synthesis of cholesterol that is the substance from which testosterone is derived. The latter is a steroid hormone of the androgen group produced mainly by the cells in the testes. In man it is a member of the development of the sexual organs and in the adult, the levels of testosterone play a fundamental role in fertility. This hormone also regulates desire, erection, and sexual satisfaction; it has the function of synchronizing sexual desire with the actual sexual act by regulating the beginning and end of penile erection. A libido deficiency is often associated with a testosterone dysfunction. With the statins, then, a fundamental mechanism, the production of testosterone, is halted.

Recent pharmacogenetics studies have shown that 65% of patients taking statin drugs do not benefit from it. Today with too much ease prescribing these medicines whose side effects are very heavy. Statins are part of the so-called ‘sick drugs’ behind which pharmaceutical companies have built a business. Over the past 50 years, the pharmaceutical industry has promoted an incredible propaganda campaign by employing scientists, advertising agencies, media and doctors, quickly bringing statins to being one of the best-selling drugs classes. In the United States there is no difficulty in publishing studies that instead highlight the adverse effects that statins have on a person’s health, especially after many months of therapy.

But the worst effect of statins yet is that the body is deprived of coenzyme Q10 which is essential to the functioning of the heart. Q10 is an important antioxidant, self-produced by the body and partially regulated by HMG-CoA and its depletion puts the whole organism at risk of oxidation. One thing that doctors do not say is that it is of the utmost importance that those who make use of these substances to reduce cholesterol, or even those who have stopped taking them, immediately embark on CoQ10.

It is good to note that coenzyme Q10 is liposoluble, so it should be taken during a meal that also contains polyunsaturated fats. Taking it with water does not render any effect and it would be best to take it in synergy with all vitamin complexes. Statins prevent the synthesis of Q10 in the human body. This fact is documented in the Merck patent. Neither Merck nor other pharmaceutical companies have added Q10 doses to their statins. The result: a high number of deaths attributable to the action of these medicines, which forced the withdrawal of statins from some markets.

Regarding the statins’ dangerousness, the reader will surely remember the case of Lipobay and the patients who died of this medicine withdrawn from business a few years ago. And here is what the experts have to say about this:

All statins (the class of molecules to which Lipobay belongs) prescribed for cholesterol control, have a rare side effect: rhabdomyolysis. It is a phenomenon in which muscle tissue cells tend to ‘break’. This may be due to traumas affecting the muscles or even prolonged efforts, both to the action of toxic substances and ultimately as a side effect of other drugs other than statins. However, this phenomenon proved to be more frequent for cerivastatin. If rhabdomyolysis involves an organ failure or crises the kidneys because they can not dispose of the excess of circulating substances from the affected muscle, it can have lethal consequences. There are 31 cases of death in America, twenty in the world and three in Germany. But the problem is not the drug itself as its combination with other therapies. The association with gemfibrozil, a drug that lowers the level of triglycerides, has proven to be really dangerous in 12 American dead patients, as well as in the only Italian case.

The medication is withdrawn, leaving about fifty victims in the field. Researchers at the Tulane University School of Medicine have used electronic tomography (EBT) to measure progression in the formation of plaque of infarcted patients taking statins. EBT is a very accurate test to measure calcium inclusions in the arteries. Contrary to the predictions, the researchers found that the progression of coronary artery calcification (CAC) was significantly higher in patients taking statins compared to those who did not take it. The researchers said: ‘CAC continues to explain why some patients do not benefit from statins, but rather increase the risk of cardiovascular disease.

At this point scientists try to find the answer to the question: what about the advantages of taking statins, are they worth the risks? And could it be that Cialis, known for its many more benefits than fighting ED, will be approved to address cholesterol problem in a safer way in the nearest future?